9th – 12th Grade

The online curriculum that Charity Christian Academy uses is Ignitia. It is both challenging and flexible which makes it work well for most students. It is a comprehensive curriculum for grades 3 – 12, with five core courses (Bible, History, Language Arts, Math, and Science) and over 30 electives available. The courses include text-based lessons, quizzes, and tests, along with videos, games, and projects. We also have optional science kits to make experiments easier to do at home.

To see courses, please go to our resource page.

Online education is not “the easy way out of school”. It takes dedication to get the required assignments completed. Younger students can often complete their main assignments in just a few hours, while older students need to plan on a minimum of four and a half hours or more per day. Students are required to earn a minimum of 80% per unit or they get the privilege of doing part or all of the unit over to reinforce the concepts that were not understood the first time they studied it.

Every student is required to take placement tests to help determine if they have any learning gaps in their education. A learning gap sometimes arises because different curricula teaches subjects in a different order. Sometimes it is because a student didn’t quite understand a certain concept. A learning gap can affect a student’s progress and should be fixed before going forward.

Parents receive monthly online attendance reports. These reports tell down to the second how long a student was actively engaged in learning on the school website. Report cards are emailed quarterly.

Available Electives:

AP Courses

AP Calculus (Grades 10 - 12)
AP Calculus is a full-year, high school credit course that is intended for the student who has successfully mastered a minimum of four high school level mathematics courses that cover analytical and conceptual algebra (with a heavy emphasis on functions), coordinate and plane geometry, and trigonometric functions. It is highly recommended that the student successfully complete pre-calculus as a prerequisite. The course primarily focuses on the skills and methods of analyzing the graphical behavior of functions, the definition of a derivative as well as applications of derivatives, integration and their relationships with the graphical function.
Required Resources
Some assignments in this course require the use of resources that must be supplied by the user. These outside resources are listed below by assignment.

All Assignments
Scratch Paper/Notebook
Scientific or Graphing Calculator
Graph Paper-Coordinate
Scanner, for scanning handwritten problems and solutions that student will upload for lessons
Textbook: Calculus of a Single Variable by Ron Larson, Robert Hostettler, and Bruce Edwards (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2002; ISBN 0-618-14916-3)

AP Comparative Government and Politics (Grades 10 - 12)
Comparative Government and Politics will introduce students to the diverse political environment outside the United States. The course will compare six selected countries with respect to their political structure and policies as well as different challenges within each of those countries. Students will also examine how different governments solve similar problems and then compare the effectiveness of their approach.

Additional Resources
Below is a list of resources that are not included in this course and must be acquired separately.

Introducing Comparative Politics: Concepts and Cases in Context 3rd Edition, Stephen Orvis and Carol Ann Drogus; ISBN 978-1452241524 SAGE Publications.
AP Compartative Government and Politics: An Essential Coursebook 6th Edition, Ethel Wood; ISBN 978-0-9831766-9-5 WoodYard Publications.

AP English Language and Composition (Grades 10 - 12)
This is a college-level course to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Language and Composition exam by engaging in critical reading, writing, and discussion. The stated purpose of the course (from the College Board) is to “emphasize the expository, analytical, and argumentative writing that forms the basis of academic and professional communication.” To accomplish this goal, students learn to read texts closely to determine the author’s purpose and means of conveying his or her message.

In addition to various passages and articles, students engage in analysis of images to better understand the processes of communication, persuasion, and argument. The goal is to develop skills in analyzing, explaining, and arguing through the analysis of texts from various time periods and genres and through writing formal and informal responses to them in a variety of modes.

Students will also complete quizzes, timed essays, and practice tests to help prepare for the AP exam throughout the course.

Below is a list of resources that are not included in this course and must be acquired separately.

Cry, the Beloved Country Alan Paton
The Language of Composition Renee H. Shea et al.

AP Human Geography (Grades 10 - 12)
Human Geography is taught as an introductory-level college course intended to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Human Geography exam through a hands-on and inquiry-based approach. This two-semester course will teach students the basic concepts of human geography and give them a geographic framework for the analysis of current world problems through case studies, computer applications, and fieldwork. The students will learn to use the tools of a geographer to ask geographic questions; acquire, organize, and analyze geographic information; and answer geographic questions. They will also take online, multiple-choice quizzes, and practice free-response questions (FRQs) in preparation for the AP exam.

The students will also need access to map collections, atlases, encyclopedias, and other reference materials both online and in their local libraries.

Resources
Below is a list of resources that are not included in this course and must be acquired separately.

Human Geography: Landscapes of Human Activities, 11th Edition, Jerome D. Fellmann, Mark D. Bjelland, Arthur Getis, and Judith Getis; ISBN 978-0-07-352285-2, McGraw Hill Publications.
Human Geography in Action, 6th Edition, Michael Kuby, John Harner, and Patricia Gober; ISBN 978-1-118-42257-1, John Wiley & Sons Inc. Publications.

AP Macroeconomics (Grades 10 - 12)
Macroeconomics is the study of the performance of an economy as a whole. This course will cover in detail basic economic concepts, measurement of economic performance, national income and price determination, the financial sector, inflation, unemployment and stabilization policies, economic growth and productivity, and international trade and finance. Upon completing this course, students will be trained to interpret economic news, understand the effects of government policies, and excel on the AP exam. The learning methodologies in this course are varied and highly interactive, and the main textbook will be supplemented with economic simulation games, application reports, assessments, and videos.

Resources
Below is a list of resources that are not included in this course and must be acquired separately.

Principles of Economics, 2.0 Version, Libby Rittenberg and Timothy Tregarthen; ISBN 978-1453352335, Flat World Knowledge Inc. Publications.
Advanced Placement Economics: Macroeconomics, Student Manual, 4th Edition, Margaret A. Ray; ISBN 978-1-56183-668-0, Concil for Economic Education.

AP U.S. Government and Politics (Grades 10 - 12)
The AP U.S. Government and Politics course offers students an advanced study of topics concerning the nation’s founding and form of government, as well as an examination of historical and current political issues. The goal of this course is to provide information and skills to prepare students for the AP exam. The assignments in this course utilize an assigned textbook and study guide, as well as links to external content and articles.

Resources
Below is a list of resources that are not included in this course and must be acquired separately.
Keeping the Republic, 6th Edition, Christine Barbour and Gerald C. Wright; ISBN 978-1-4522-2016-1, SAGE Publications.
5 Steps to a 5, AP U.S. Government and Politics, 2017 Edition, Pamela K. Lamb; ISBN 978-1-259-58539-5, McGraw Hill Publications.

AP US History (Grades 10 - 12)
U.S. History is an advanced history course that helps students prepare for the College Board’s AP exam. The course emphasizes the movements and events that have shaped the United States from its earliest beginnings to the present day.

Additional Resources
In addition to the default course program, U.S. History – Advanced Placement includes alternate lessons, projects, essays, and tests for use in enhancing instruction or addressing individual needs.

All Projects, Reports, and Essays
Supplies needed to complete most projects, reports, and essays throughout this course:

Internet, encyclopedia or other research materials
Paper, pencils or other writing materials
Printer

Textbook:

Semester one: The American Pageant: A History of the Republic by David Kennedy, et al. Volume 1: To 1877: Houghton Mifflin, 2006 [ISBN: 0618479287].
AND
Semester two: The American Pageant: A History of the Republic by David Kennedy, et al. Volume 2: Since 1865: Houghton Mifflin, 2006 [ISBN: 0618479295].
OR
Covers both semesters: The American Pageant: A History of the Republic by David Kennedy, et al.: Houghton Mifflin, 2006 [ISBN: 0618479279].

Career and Technical Electives

A/V Technology and Film Careers (Grades 9 - 12)
This course discusses careers in audio/visual (AV) technology and film, and provides students with background about the required skills, education, equipment, and technology in this industry. Students will understand the collaborative team effort of many different professionals who make films, videos, audio, and TV programming. The course begins with an introduction to the history and development of AV technology and film, with subsequent units focusing on specific sectors of the industry and the stages for producing film and media. The concluding unit focuses on the finishing stages for exhibition, distribution, and reaching a market. In addition, the course will provide information about many different careers that are available to students who are interested in AV technology and film
Banking Services Careers (Grades 9 - 12)
The exchange of money in the United States is generally managed with the services of banks and other financial institutions, whose reputations depend greatly on customer satisfaction and trust. Many of the products we use on a daily basis, like checking and savings accounts, debit cards, credit cards, and loans, are the backbone of the banking industry. This course will provide an overview of how the banking system works, what the Federal Reserve is, and the technical and social skills needed to work in banking and related services. Students will explore career paths and the required training or higher education necessary, and will gain an understanding of the basic functions of customer transactions (i.e., setting up an account, processing a loan, or establishing a business), cash drawer activity, check collection processes, and other customer service–related transactions. This course will also discuss how technology has changed banking in the 21st century. The banking industry is responsible for many of the products that we use on a daily basis, from checking and savings accounts to debit cards,credit cards, and loans.

This course will focus on the specific skills related to banking and related services. In addition, you will explore career paths and the required training or higher education preparation necessary to obtain a career in banking and related services. Also, you will gain an understanding of the basic functions of customer transactions, cash drawer activity, check collection processes, and other customer service–related transactions. This course will also discuss how technology has changed the banking and related services industry. Finally, this course will provide an overview of the technical and people skills necessary to aid consumers with setting up an account, processing a loan, or establishing a business.

Business Law (Grades 10 - 12)
This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge of some of the vital legal concepts that affect commerce and trade. First, they will gain some familiarity with how laws are created and interpreted. Then, they will be introduced to the types of businesses that can be created to engage in commerce as well as the contractual and liability considerations that can impact a business. Laws that affect how a business is regulated will also be reviewed, particularly the impact of administrative rules and regulations on a business.

As the students work through matters of law and business, they will also consider scriptural principles.

Global commerce and international agreements, treaties, organizations, and courts that can affect business will be discussed to get a better sense of what it means to “go global” with a business. This global emphasis will also survey what is prophesied in the Bible about buying and selling in the last days.

Consumer and environmental protections will be explained as well as bankruptcy options, should a business go insolvent. In particular, students will look at what the Bible has to say about the ethics of bankruptcy. Lastly, no business exists without experiencing some kind of dispute or another, and so we will review the options that exist for dispute resolution and alternative dispute resolution to provide a better understanding of how best to deal with such matters.

Career Management (Grades 10 - 12)
Career Management assists students in their preparation for career selection. The course is designed to improve workforce skills needed in all careers including:

communication
leadership
teamwork
decision making
problem solving
goal setting
time management

Students will complete activities that help identify personal interests, aptitudes, and learning styles. Students will use results of self-assessments to determining careers that may prove personally satisfying.

Students will complete an in-depth career research activity that can be repeated for each future career decision. Students will also create a career portfolio as they work through the curriculum.

In addition to the default course program, Career Management includes alternate lessons, projects, and tests for use in enhancing instruction or addressing individual needs.

Requirements
Students will have to research different aspects of careers and will rely heavily on the Career Clusters developed by the U.S. Department of Education. They also will be asked to find and summarize job related information such as potential income, job requirements, and basic employability skills.

Some of the tasks in the chapter projects ask for answers that can be found in the lessons themselves, while others require research using the Internet. Students should have access to a computer with Internet and a good working knowledge of how to find information on the Web. While sample URLs are usually presented as a starting point, the student should have a basic knowledge of using search engines to find specific information.

Careers in Allied Health (Grades 10 - 12)
As a Christian, it is important to do your best in whatever career path you choose. Your desire should be to help others achieve and maintain a healthy lifestyle. A career in allied health provides you the opportunity to meet the physical needs of many people. What is allied health in relation to the healthcare industry?

Allied health is the term for the area of healthcare (and health care professions) that provide support and care services other than specific doctoring and nurse care. At times, the line between allied health and “non-allied health” may seem to be separated by level of degree/education, although this is not always true.

Allied health career paths can be divided into general roles like diagnostic (testing to see what is wrong), technical (taking care of technologyaspects), therapeutic (moving the patient toward healing) and direct patient care (caring for the patient in other ways), although there is some overlap in a few roles. There are a few hundred potential jobs and dozens of potential settings that one could work in.

The career field is important for several reasons. First, the care and support that allied health professionals provide is integral to the health care system. In addition it is estimated that these professionals make up more than half of the entire health care field. This representation within the industry shows how very important the various roles are.

In this course, we will focus on select allied health careers, studying a variety of different levels, responsibilities, settings, education needs and amounts of patient contact. We will look at things like the degree or training needed for each job, the environment one would work in, how much money the position could make, and the facts of the actual working day.

Then, within each job group, we will explore important aspects that are applicable to the entire field of allied health, such as behaving ethically, working as a team, keeping patients safe and free from infections and germs, honoring diverse needs of diverse patients, and following laws and policies.

The last unit will then include several activities that allow the student to seriously engage with their career exploration and selection.

Requirements
Pre-requisites:

Since this course leans heavily on reporting and research, students should already know how to choose appropriate resources (especially online), and how to properly cite those resources.

Supplies and resources:
2-4 pieces of poster board/large paper (or graphics/drawing software)
Access to newspaper/media archives
2-5 Paper plates
Drawing tools
Suggested: Copy of the book “Alex, the Life of a Child” by Frank DeFord

Careers in Logistics Planning and Management Services (Grades 9 - 12)
This course discusses careers in Logistics Planning and Management Services, and provides students with the history of logistics and recent advances in the field. The history of logistics creates a foundation of knowledge to build our understanding of the social and economic benefits of modern logistics. Modern societies and economic development depend on the ability to transport products from their point of origin to store shelves and then into the hands of consumers. Current trends in logistics favor low-cost methods, safety, technology, sustainability, and regulations to keep the goods flowing from their source to the consumers.
Careers in Manufacturing Processes (Grades 9 - 12)
Careers in Manufacturing Processes concerns the manufacturing process, from the conception of a new product through the prototype stage to fabrication, assembly, testing, and customer satisfaction. Manufacturing is the beating heart of American enterprise. Indeed, it is the heart of the economy of any advanced industrialized nation. This course examines every aspect of the manufacturing process from strategy and management to factory-floor tactics.
Careers in Marketing Research (Grades 9 - 12)
Marketing research is the foundation of all marketing activities because it provides the data needed to make key strategic decisions about products, promotions, pricing, and other key organizational decisions. This course will provide information about the process of investigation and problem analysis by using research to produce key marketing statistics that are communicated to management and used throughout the organization. This course concludes with the execution, interpretation, and presentation of marketing research.
Construction Careers (Grades 10 - 12)
This course in Construction Technology introduces students to the basics of construction, building systems, engineering principles, urban planning, and sustainability. Students will learn the key techniques in building all types of buildings, as well as the key individuals involved in each step of the process. Many lessons present information on green building techniques
Engineering and Design (Grades 10 - 12)
Engineering and Design is part of the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) education and career path. By building real-world problem-solving and critical-thinking skills, students learn how to innovate and design new products and improve existing products. Students are introduced to the engineering design process to build new products and to the reverse engineering process, which enables engineers to adjust any existing product.

Parallels and analogies from Scriptural examples will firmly seat the course in Bible truth, since God is the master engineer, designer, and creator of everything. Popular topics and issues that are politically controversial will be explored from a Biblical perspective.

A second and equally important emphasis will address how fluid power is used by engineers to make difficult maneuvers easier, increasing efficiency and minimizing effects on the environment. Students will then identify how engineering and design have a direct impact on environmental sustainability and economic greening, with Bible principles incorporated when appropriate. Finally, students will incorporate the engineering design process, environmental life cycle, and green engineering principles to create a decision matrix to learn how to solve environmental issues, while identifying how following God’s original principles would have avoided producing those issues in the first place.
It is helpful if students are familiar with renewable and nonrenewable resources.
Many of the principles discussed in this course can be better addressed through the use of broken machines, toys, and electronics. Collection of these materials prior to the course will greatly help the student in the course.

Engineering and Innovation (Grades 11 - 12)
The Engineering and Innovation course will provide students with an understanding of the field of engineering and introduction to the concepts of invention and innovation, as well as some of the skills and tools necessary to invent and innovate. This information will provide students with the ability to invent and innovate in their field of choice.

Students will learn details about the scope and nature of the field of engineering, as well as the Biblical principles that serve as the foundation for engineering and work in general. They will also learn about the history of invention and innovation and how those activities play a role in the advancement of human society. Students will be introduced to patents, regulations, and ethical and professional standards that apply in the fields of engineering and invention.

Students will also learn about analytical modeling and problem solving, interpreting the results of models and experiments, and understanding how bias impacts outcomes. In addition, students will learn about innovations and inventions in the fields of biomedicine and the environment and how those fields have impacted the health and well being of society. Lastly, students will learn about career choices and organizations and resources available for individuals who wish to incorporate invention and innovation into their careers and lives.
For topics in this course, it is helpful for students to be familiar with general concepts of the world of business as well as the basics of conducting research on websites.

If students are unfamiliar with these topics, it is recommended that they familiarize themselves with conducting online searches for business-related topics on the Internet by visiting sites such as Business.USA.gov or business magazine websites such as Forbes.com or BusinessWeek.com. These websites will provide an introduction to what is currently happening in the business world as well as give students an opportunity to practice navigating websites.

Engineering and Product Development (Grades 10 - 12)
Engineers address society’s needs and problems by designing and producing products and services. The field is diverse and includes Christian professionals who design skyscrapers, design machinery, oversee public works, and develop software and systems.

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the concepts of product engineering and development from a Christ-centered perspective. Students will analyze the life cycle of a product to prepare it for distribution and target markets. The course begins with building an understanding of the product life cycle, from the initial idea to drafting requirements to using 3-D modeling tools and other design tools. The final unit focuses on assembling project plan pieces for a product and evaluating the plans for a successful product launch. In addition, the course will provide information about the different careers available to students interested in engineering, product development, and project management, as well as, organizations that provide encouragement to Christian engineers.

For topics in this course, it is helpful for students to be familiar with general concepts about engineering, as well as the basics of accessing IT tools and resources for conducting research on web sites.

If students are not familiar with these topics, it is important for them to familiarize themselves with online resources for engineering and product development.

Fundamentals of Computer Systems (Grades 10 - 12)
The Computer Fundamentals course will provide students with an understanding of computers and how they operate as well as a basic understanding of how to manage and maintain computers and computer systems. These skills will provide students with the ability to configure computers and solve computer problems.

Students will learn details about the different elements of computers and computer systems. They will learn to identify hardware devices and their functions. They will be instructed on the role of operating systems as well as how to install and customize the Windows operating system. Students will learn about networking and the Internet. They will also be introduced to security issues in order to protect themselves and their computers and data.

Students will also learn about some of the software applications typically used on computers today, such as Microsoft Office. In addition, students will learn specifics about maintaining and troubleshooting computers, including managing files, backing up systems, and using the administrative tools in the Windows operating system. Lastly, the students will learn the basics of customer service and working as a help desk support technician.

Fundamentals of Computer Systems Course Requirements
For topics in this course, it is helpful for students to be familiar with the basics of using desktop or laptop computers as well as accessing Web sites over the Internet.

If students are not familiar with these topics, it is recommended, though not required, that they familiarize themselves with the operating system and Web browser they will be using for this course. This includes turning on a computer and logging into an account, if necessary, exploring the different types of software available, navigating through some of the operating system menus to understand the available tools, and doing a basic search on the Internet.

Fundamentals of Digital Media (Grades 9 - 12)
This course gives an overview of the different types of digital media and how they are used in the world today. Students examine the impact that digital media has on culture and lifestyle. The course reviews the basic concepts for creating effective digital media and introduces a number of different career paths that relate to digital media.

Students will examine some tools used to create digital media and discuss best practices in the creating of digital media. This includes an overview of the process used to create new media pieces as well as the basics concepts of project management.

In the course, students will examine the use of social media, digital media in advertising, digital media on the World Wide Web, digital media in business, gaming and simulations, e-commerce, and digital music and movies. Students will review ethics and laws that impact digital media use or creation.

Fundamentals of Programming and Software Development (Grades 10 - 12)
This course will provide students with an understanding of basic software development concepts and practices, issues affecting the software industry, careers within the software industry, and the skills necessary to perform well in these occupations.

Students will learn details about core concepts in programming using Java, including writing and debugging code, proper syntax, flow of control, order of operations, comparison operators, and program logic tools and models.

They will learn the function of key program techniques including if statements, looping, and arrays. They will also learn about web development using HTML and drag-and-drop development of user interfaces in an Integrated Development environment.

Students will also learn about the Software Development Life Cycle and the different variations used to create software. They will learn about different programming languages and paradigms. They will learn about the importance of usability and user-centered design processes. Students will also learn about careers in the software industry, the education and skills required to work in the industry, and related career resources. Finally, the capstone project will allow students to explore and state opinions on key issues and trends impacting the software industry, and to learn about the experience of working in the industry.

Fundamentals of Programming and Software Development Course Requirements
For topics in this course, it is helpful for students to be familiar with the basics of using desktop and laptop computers as well as accessing websites over the Internet.

If students are unfamiliar with these topics, it is recommended, though not required, that they familiarize themselves with creating and saving files in a text editing or word processing application and with using web browsers and conducting searches on the Internet.

Additionally, activities in this course require that the Java Software Development Kit (SDK) and the NetBeans Integrated Development Environment (IDE) is installed on students’ computers. Instructions are included in the Unit 1 lesson titled “Introduction to Java Programming.”

Introduction to Careers in Architecture and Construction (Grades 10 - 12)
The goal of this course is to provide students with an overview of careers in Architecture and Construction in order to assist with informed career decisions. This dynamic, rapidly evolving career cluster is comprised of three pathways (fields): Design and Pre-Construction (Architecture and Engineering); Construction (Construction and Extraction); and Maintenance and Operations (Installation, Maintenance, and Repair). The Architecture and Construction career cluster is defined as careers in building, designing, managing, maintaining, and planning the built environment.

The built environment is not limited to buildings and structures—or to urban environments. A much broader view of the built environment helps students gain a better and more holistic understanding of the impact of the Architecture and Construction industries. The built environment encompasses all zones of human activity—from natural conservation areas with minimal human intervention to highly dense areas with tall skyscrapers and intricate highway systems to suburban cul-de-sacs. The interrelated components that make up the built environment are as varied and unique as the professionals who help shape it.

Introduction to Careers in Architecture and Construction Course Requirements
This is an introductory course in careers in architecture and construction. As such, there are no prerequisites other than interest in the subject for the student. Students will need online access in order to locate the research materials they will need to review. Some course projects also require online research. Microsoft Office software or the equivalent is required since the student will create presentations using PowerPoint.

Certain projects suggest some minimal physical field work, but virtual alternatives are available should students lack access to the suggested physical sites.

Communications skills, personal skills in recall and observation, experience assessment, and self-analysis are part of certain projects. Some projects direct students to interact with others to some extent; this should be within reach for any student.

Introduction to Careers in Arts, A/V Technology and Communications (Grades 10 - 12)
This introductory course provides comprehensive information on five separate areas of arts and communications as potential educational and career pathways. Students who are interested in careers across a broad spectrum of professional positions, including fine artist, telecommunications administrator, magazine editor, broadcast journalist, or computer graphics artist, will gain useful perspective on industry terminology, technology, work environment, job outlook, and guiding principles.

Introduction to Careers in the Arts, A/V Technology, and Communications Course Requirements
As this course targets students interested in potential careers in the arts, some artistic ability or experience is assumed. However, there are many technical and writing careers presented in this course as well, so the course offers a wealth of information for all students interested in working in arts management, in printing publishing, in news, and in communications fields (such as advertising, marketing, or sales, and in telecommunications).

Most of the careers and professional fields outlined in this course stress the need to understand terminology, the roles of others, and the importance of working as a team. Students need to consider interpersonal skills and should be able to discuss or consider workplace issues, including ethical and legal responsibilities, when working with others. Combining training and work experience during post-secondary education is a winning pathway in many of the careers evaluated. The course explores viable options and gives students opportunities to research specifics for their own plans.

Students need an aptitude for independent research, creative and critical thinking skills, and the ability to understand technical vocabulary and procedures at a foundational level.

Introduction to Careers in Education and Training (Grades 9 - 12)
The Introduction to Careers in Education and Training course will introduce students to the field of education and training, and the opportunities available for early-childhood care, primary school, secondary school, higher education, vocational training, and adult and continuing education. The students will gain an understanding of the career options available in teaching, administrative work, and support services. They will also explore the education and background experience needed to succeed in these careers.

Students will learn about the evolution of the modern educational system in the United States, and the policies and laws that govern educational institutions. They will also discover the similarities and differences between the ethical and legal obligations of working with adults versus working with children.

Introduction to Careers in Finance (Grades 9 - 12)
The Introduction to Careers in Finance course provides the fundamentals of the financial services industry in the United States and explores the jobs and career opportunities that the industry offers.

Unit 1 introduces the financial services industry and the financial systems that operate in the US and internationally.

Unit 2 examines securities markets and investment companies, looks at how companies evaluate and mitigate risk, and discusses the valuation of stocks and bonds.

Unit 3 discusses the roles and responsibilities of corporate finance and accounting, analysis of financial statements, capital budgeting, and capital structure.

Unit 4 focuses on banking services, including how the industry is organized and regulated and how risks are managed.

Unit 5 looks at the insurance industry, including how it is organized and regulated, how it addresses risks, and the career opportunities it offers.

Introduction to Careers in Government and Public Administration (Grades 9 - 12)
The Introduction to Government and Public Administration course will provide students with an overview of American politics and public administration, including how political institutions and public management systems at the local, state, and federal levels exercise supervisory authority and maintain accountability.

Students will learn about the foundations of the U.S. government, the separation of powers, the federal civil service system, and the relationship between the government and state and local officials.

They will also learn about governmental powers of the states and of local governments, such as education, law enforcement, and transportation.

Introduction to Careers in Manufacturing (Grades 9 - 12)
The Introduction to Careers in Manufacturing course provides the fundamentals of manufacturing in the United States and explores the jobs and career opportunities that manufacturing offers.
Introduction to Careers in Marketing (Grades 9 - 12)
The Introduction to Marketing course will provide students with an overview of marketing, which is an essential element for any company that produces products that are bought and used by individuals.

Students will learn about what marketing is and how the process of marketing works, the role of market research and how companies incorporate ethics into their marketing strategies.

They will also learn about the importance of strategic planning for marketers, the five step marketing strategic process, and strategies for growth.

Students will learn about the environment in which marketers operate. This includes the microenvironment, which refers to entities and influences close to the company or marketer, and the macroenvironment, which refers to influences that impact all of society, such as culture, social trends, and technology.

They will also learn about the Four P’s of the marketing mix: product, price, promotion, and place. Students will evaluate the importance of each of these four elements and learn specifically about how technology has changed the approach to the marketing mix. They will also learn about international markets and how to approach marketing at a global level.

After completing this course, students will have a fundamental understanding of the principles of marketing. They will be able to explain the marketing process, marketing strategic planning, the marketing environment, and the trends, opportunities, and challenges in the marketing world today.

Introduction to Careers in Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics (Grades 9 - 12)
Transportation and Distribution Logistics is a course intended to introduce students to the complicated world of commercial transportation. This area of commerce is becoming increasingly complex and sophisticated, with work and career openings available at all levels of education. Most people, however, see only fragments of the big picture.

Transportation is among the most crucial and defining elements of modern commerce. The ability to move people and goods from place to place requires vast investments of technology, and of manpower. Without that investment almost all aspects of modern life would grind to a halt.

Introduction to Consumer Services (Grades 10 - 12)
In this introductory Consumer Services course, students will analyze various career paths in terms of employment opportunities. Educational requirements, including applicable hard and soft skills, certifications, and licensures for different pathways, will be discussed. Developing research, analytical, and presentations skills will be key components.

This course is designed as an overview to prepare students for a consumer services–related career and to introduce them to specialty areas. Emphasis is placed on the human services aspect (vs. corporate concerns) of consumer services, as well as Biblical principles and standards. Social issues and advocacy, as well as ethics and legalities, are a recurring theme. Students will gain knowledge of current issues affecting various consumer services professions and of the impact of local, state, national, and global issues on consumer services.

Introduction to Consumer Services Course Requirements
Students should be computer literate at an intermediate level and have Internet access. Students should have basic research skills, as well as the ability to conduct online searches and access recommended Web sites. Basic math skills at the Algebra I level (arithmetic, ratios, graphing) are required. Intermediate-level proficiency with word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software is highly encouraged, as is access to these programs for use in producing projects.

Introduction to Information Technology (Grades 9 - 12)
In this course, we introduce students to the knowledge base and technical skills that will help them to successfully compete for jobs within the Information Technology Career Cluster. Lessons are structured so that students learn and then demonstrate not only critical assessment and analytic skills, but also interpersonal skills that are valued so highly among IT employers.

We explore a range of career tracks that include network engineers, application/programming developers, and systems analysts. These career paths are described in depth, discussing typical job responsibilities, educational and licensure requirements, working conditions, and job outlooks.

Our lessons help students place the evolution of technology and job opportunities in context so that they will understand their important role in furthering its development. We believe that the most successful IT professionals combine technical know-how with leadership ability. To this end, students learn that their acquired expertise comes with the responsibility to represent themselves and the companies they work for within the highest legal and ethical standards.

Requirements
Students should have access to a laptop or desktop computer.
Students should have access to a smart device.

Introduction to Information Technology Support and Services (Grades 9 - 12)
This course focuses on real-world application including common industry best practices and specific vendors that offer tools for technicians, project managers, and IT leadership. Emphasis should be made that the purpose of the IT department of an enterprise is to support the overall mission of the company, and it is not simply a standalone component of the company’s infrastructure. Students will continue to apply their knowledge of hardware and software components associated with IT systems while exploring a variety of careers related to IT support and services. Students will analyze technical support needs to perform customer service, perform configuration management activities, and evaluate application software packages and emerging software. Students will demonstrate and apply knowledge of IT analysis and design by initiating a system project and evaluating applications within the IT system. Information Technology is a dynamic discipline that is continuously evolving.

Introduction to Information Support and Services: Course Requirements
This is an introductory course in support and services providing information technology services and management. There are no requirements other than a basic familiarity with personal computers and the Internet. Students should be able to access the web and to use it to retrieve information and create accounts on free services.

Introduction to Network Systems (Grades 9 - 12)
How can we automate the transfer of information from one computer to another? To answer that question, this course introduces students to the fundamental technology and concepts that make networking systems possible. The question itself is a very practical one and the concepts taught are more concerned with practices and processes rather than theoretical generalities.

The most important concept introduced is that of the OSI reference model and its bottom four layers, which are most directly concerned with networking instead of computing. Each networking layer is explored in a three-lesson chapter. By the end of the course, every student should be comfortable reading a sentence that says something like, “X is a protocol working at the third layer.”

Keyboarding and Applications (Grades 8 - 12)
Keyboarding and Applications is a semester-long elective that teaches students keyboarding skills, technical skills, effective communication skills, and productive work habits. In this course, students will learn about proper keyboarding technique. Once students have been introduced to keyboarding skill, lessons will include daily practice of those skills. Students will gain an understanding of computer hardware, operating systems, file management, and the Internet. In addition, they will apply their keyboarding skills and create a variety of business documents, including word processing documents and electronic presentations.

Keyboarding and Applications Course Requirements
word-processor software
presentation software

National Security Careers (Grades 9 - 12)
This course discusses careers in national security. It provides you with the history, background, and recent advances in this field. Millions of people work in national security positions, from military enlisted personnel, writers, politicians, photographers, and law enforcement personnel to agents, investigators, scientists, and administrative personnel. Just about any career you can imagine is available in national security.
Network System Design (Grades 9 - 12)
The Network System Design course will provide students with an understanding of computer networks and how they operate, as well as a basic understanding of how to manage and maintain computer networks. These skills will provide students with the ability to design, configure, and troubleshoot networks of all sizes.

Students will learn the basics of network design, including how to identify network requirements and determine the proper network architecture. They will be instructed on the requirements of network models, as well as be introduced to local area networks. Students will also learn about Internet Protocol and the basics of routing data on a network.

Students will be introduced to wide area networks and network security issues. In addition, students will learn about network management, including monitoring and troubleshooting. Last, students will learn about network operating systems and their role in connecting computers and facilitating communications.

For topics in this course, it is helpful for students to be familiar with the basics of computer hardware (desktop and laptop), as well as desktop operating systems.

If students are not familiar with these topics, it is recommended, though not required, that they be introduced to computer hardware and desktop or workstation operating systems before starting this course. That includes examining hardware devices such as motherboards, hard drives, and processing chips and exploring the features and functions of a workstation operating system.

New Applications: Web Development in the 21st Century (Grades 9 - 12)
New Applications introduces students to the rapidly evolving world of apps, or applications. The introduction of the Apple II in 1977 followed by the IBM PC and scores of compatible computers just four years later created strong consumer demand for software programs, as these applications were referred to at the time. Capable of formatting spreadsheets, composing and proofing hundreds of lines of text, or supporting classroom instruction, computer programs were initially sold by specialty stores, college bookstores, or through the mail.

This is an introductory course in the history and development of new applications for use on web-enabled devices including personal computers, tablets, smartphones, and ultrabooks. While there are no specific prerequisites for this course, students should have a basic understanding of the Internet, the World Wide Web, browsers, file formats, hardware, and software applications. Students who have working knowledge of IP addressing, programming, the differences among local, wide-area, and cloud-computing networks as well as the current state of mobile devices will be well prepared to complete this course.

Nursing: Unlimited Possibilities and Unlimited Potential (Grades 9 - 12)
Each year the Gallup Poll conducts a survey of the American public to determine the ten most respected professions in the country. Since 2001, registered nurses have topped that list.

This course provides students opportunities to compare and contrast the various academic and clinical training pathways to an entry-level position in nursing and to explore the growing number of opportunities for professional advancement given the proper preparation and experience.

Careers in Nursing Course Requirements
Technology:

Internet access (preferably high speed)
Web browser with bookmarking capabilities (Chrome, Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Apple Safari, Opera)
E-mail account
Color printer
Flatbed scanner with e-mail and Adobe Reader conversion capabilities
Access to local and long-distance telephone service
PC- or Apple-based office software suite (Microsoft Office, Apple iWork, Google Docs suite, Apache Open Office [a free software suite available at www.OpenOffice.org])
Media viewer (QuickTime, Windows Media Player or other compatible)

Small Business Entrepreneurship (Grades 10 - 12)
This semester-long course is designed to provide the skills needed to effectively organize, develop, create, and manage your own business, while exposing you to the challenges, problems, and issues faced by entrepreneurs. Throughout this course, you will be given the chance to see what kinds of opportunities exist for small business entrepreneurs and become aware of the necessary skills for running a business. You will become familiar with the traits and characteristics that are found in successful entrepreneurs, and you will see how research, planning, operations, and regulations can affect small businesses. You will learn how to develop plans for having effective business management and marketing strategies.

Small Business Entrepreneurship Course Requirements
Students must be computer literate and have Internet access. Students should have basic research skills, as well as the ability to conduct online searches and access recommended websites. Word processing and presentation software may be required to produce projects.

Software Development Tools (Grades 10 - 12)
This course introduces students to the variety of careers related to programming and software development. Students will gather and analyze customer software needs and requirements, learn core principles of programming, develop software specifications, and use appropriate reference tools to evaluate new and emerging software. Students will produce IT-based strategies and a project plan to solve specific problems, and define and analyze system and software requirements.
Teaching and Training Careers (Grades 9 - 12)
This course introduces students to the art and science of teaching. It provides a thorough exploration of pedagogy, curriculum, standards and practices, and the psychological factors shown by research to affect learners. In five units of study, lessons, and projects, students engage with the material through in-depth exploration and hands-on learning, to prepare them for teaching and training careers. Students are given many opportunities to be the teacher or trainer, and to explore the tasks, requirements, teaching strategies, and research-based methods that are effective and high-quality.

Unit One provides foundational information on the evolution of education, educational formats, learning theories and theorists, and the interconnectedness of knowledge areas in teaching and training careers. In Unit Two, students become teachers, creating courses and lesson plans to standards, in their exploration of instructional design and planning. They investigate resources and types of materials teachers select, use, and create.

Unit Three focuses on classroom strategies, as students role-play in simulations to devise methods of handling classroom issues and engage individual learners. They assess student and teacher performance through assessments themselves, examining the effectiveness of various methods. Unit Four focuses on the importance of a positive environment, as evidenced through research, and students identify elements that achieve this outcome. Students contrast inclusion-based education with previous instructional models from educational history. Unit Five completes the 30 lesson segments with student investigation of data collection; rankings; student records; and how data is collected, compiled, used, and stored. Students research outreach methods and accountability regulations and practices, to see how data use affects community standing and relationships, policy reform, and school reputation.

Students complete the course with a comprehensive knowledge of what is required in educational qualifications, preparing for, obtaining, and excelling in a teaching and training career they are encouraged to determine for themselves. They gain an informed awareness of research-based methods, effective strategies, the needs of individual learners, and the challenges teachers and trainers face in today’s educational landscape.

Technology and Business (Grades 9 – 12)
Technology and Business is a year-long, high school elective that teaches students technical skills, effective communication skills, and productive work habits needed to make a successful transition into the workplace or postsecondary education. In this course, students gain an understanding of emerging technologies, operating systems, and computer networks. In addition, they create a variety of business documents, including complex word-processing documents, spreadsheets with charts and graphs, database files, and electronic presentations.
This course provides key knowledge and skills in the following areas:
1. Emerging Technologies
2. Operating Systems
3. Word Processing
4. Spreadsheets
5. Databases
6. Communication Skills
7. Telecommunications
8. Electronic Presentations
9. Computer Networks
10. Project Management
Below is a list of generic resources required to complete the course:
word-processor software
spreadsheet software
database software
presentation software
e-mail

General Electives

Business Computer Information Systems (Grades 9 - 12)
BCIS is a high school elective that explores the use of technology applications in both business and personal situations. The course provides key knowledge and skills in the following areas:

communication skills
business technology
word processing applications
spreadsheet applications
database applications
telecommunications technology
desktop publishing technology
presentation technology
computer networks
computer operating systems
The course is intended to help students arrive at the following understandings:

Effective communications skills and productive work habits can increase employees’ success.
Technology solutions can help employees be more productive and effective.
Keyboarding is a stated prerequisite for this course. While there are some keyboarding reviews in the course, there is no keyboarding instruction.

Camping (Grades 7 - 12)
This is a full year course with lots of hands-on projects mixed in with lessons. There are very few quizzes and tests in this course, because the grade is primarily based off of the projects.

This course does require physical activity including camping, hiking, biking, rappelling and more.

Civics (Grades 7 - 12)
In this five-section elective, high-school students will learn about the rights and responsibilities of being an American citizen. By studying different forms of government, students will investigate what motivated America’s founding fathers as they drafted the U.S. Constitution. Students will also learn about the branches of the U.S. government as laid out in the Constitution and about the structure of state and local governments. In each unit, students will complete an in-depth project related to that unit’s topic.
Civil War (Grades 9 - 12)
You will embark on the fascinating history of the Civil War. It is a story of human choices that linked the past to the present and influenced the future. It is a drama of how one nation changed through times of conflict and cooperation. It is a tale of two children (the North and South) living under the same roof (The United States) and how they disagreed over the issues of states’ rights and slavery.
College Planner (Grades 9 - 12)
College Planner is a one-semester high-school elective, with the following goals:
guiding students in the entire college process
planning for college
selecting the right school
the application process
financial aid
guiding students who may not be headed to college
The program focuses on the decision-making process of choosing a school, covering both the application process and financial requirements. Additionally, for those students who will not be attending college or university, the course surveys non-college options.
Consumer Math (Grades 9 - 12)
Consumer Math is an introduction to the many ways in which math can be used in everyday life. The course gives practical advice on how to handle situations that involve money and math principles. Consumer Math focuses on the basic skills and methods of arithmetic and provides students the opportunity to develop experience with algebraic techniques of evaluating variables and equations, including geometric formulas and interest equations. Students will also be introduced to topics in statistics.
Required Resources
Some assignments in this course require the use of resources that must be supplied by the user. These outside resources are listed by assignment.

All Assignments
Scratch Paper/Notebook
Calculator

Creative Cooking (Grades 7 – 12)
Creative Cooking is a half year elective course for grades 7 – 12. It covers cake decorating, candy making, and how to host an English tea party (including the traditional foods served). This is definitely a fun home economics course.
Creative Skills (Grades 8 - 12)
This is a half year course with lots of hands-on craft projects. Students learn the basics of candle making, crocheting, painting, drawing, and more.
Digital Arts (Grades 8 - 12)
Digital Arts is a semester-long elective designed to provide computer science students with an introduction to visualization-graphics programming on computers. To equip students for today’s digitally driven lifestyle, this course focuses on using a digital camera and the practical application of digital imaging and editing programs. Additionally, students will work with audio-editing programs, and will also examine 3D technology and cinematography.
Throughout the course, students may be asked to answer questions or to reflect on what they’ve read in their notes. The notes are not graded. Rather, they are a way for students to extend their thinking about the lesson content. Students may keep handwritten or typed notes.
Additional Resources
In addition to the default course program, Digital Arts includes extra alternate lessons, projects, and tests for use in enhancing instruction or addressing individual needs. Below is a list of suggested resources which can be used in conjunction with these assignments.

All Projects, Reports and Essays
Supplies needed to complete most projects, reports, and essays throughout this course:
Internet Access
Students will be asked to download free software, such as Photoshop Express or Audacity.
A digital camera is also recommended, but is not mandatory.

Earth Science (Grades 9 - 12)
Earth Science is a high school science course that explores Earth’s structure, interacting systems, and place in the universe. The course uncovers concepts and processes found in:

astronomy – Earth’s place in and interaction with space,
geology – physical structure and dynamic processes,
meteorology – atmosphere, weather and climate, and
oceanography – oceans and marine life.

Students will have the opportunity to evaluate and explore many scientific concepts by participating in interactive lab sessions, conducting hands-on activities, and completing projects designed to improve the understanding of Earth and its dynamic functions.

Additional Resources
Some assignments in this course require the use of resources that must be supplied by the user.

Essentials of Business (Grades 9 - 12)
This semester-long course is an introduction to the goals, processes, and operations of business enterprises for students. The main focus is on the functions that a company – whether a multinational corporation or a corner grocery store – must manage effectively to be successful. These include accounting, finance, human resource management, marketing, operations management, and strategic planning. Attention is also given to the legal environment in which businesses operate, and the importance of business ethics and corporate citizenship.

Throughout the course, students may be asked to answer questions or to reflect on what they’ve read in their notes. The notes are not graded. Rather, they are a way for students to extend their thinking about the lesson content. Students may keep handwritten or typed notes.

Additional Resources
In addition to the default course program, Essentials of Business includes extra alternate lessons, projects, and tests for use in enhancing instruction or addressing individual needs. Below is a list of suggested resources which can be used in conjunction with these assignments.

All Projects, Reports, and Essays in Course
Supplies needed to complete most projects, reports, and essays throughout this course:
Internet or other research material
Paper, pencils, or other writing material
Printer
1Project: Your Role in Business
Local business person for an interview
1Project: Role of Future Business Leaders of America
Optional: Device that records audio or audio-visual

Essentials of Communication (Grades 9 - 12)
Essentials of Communication: A Guide to Interacting Effectively in Today’s World™ is a five-unit elective course for high school students. The materials cover fundamentals of the communication process important for successful interaction in a variety of social and professional settings. Students can use the course to gain and apply knowledge about communication theories, characteristics of language and language use, interpersonal relationships, group dynamics, and public speaking in order to interact more effectively with others.
Family and Consumer Science (Grades 9 - 12)
Family and Consumer Science is a 10-unit elective that uses Biblical principles to help high school students develop positive self-esteem and learn to successfully navigate relationships with family, friends, co-workers, and even those in the marketplace. The curriculum introduces students to character and appearance from a Biblical perspective. The material also teaches about nutrition, clothing styles, home care and hospitality, personal finance, and child development and care.
Fishing (Grades 7 - 12)
Fishing is a half year course for students in grades 7 – 12. the course consists primarily of projects that help the student to learn skills in selecting and caring for their equipment in addition to catching fish for the dinner table.
French I (Grades 9 - 12)
French I is an entry level high school foreign language course that explores the French language through communication, culture, connections, comparisons, and communities.
Course materials are designed to support students as they work to gain a basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural competency.
French II (Grades 10 - 12)
French II is a high school foreign language course that builds on and reviews skills and concepts taught in French I through further exposure to communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities.

Course materials are designed to support students as they work to gain a basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, writing and cultural competency.

General Science III (Grades 8 - 12)
General Science III is a basic intermediate course intended to expose students to the designs and patterns in God’s physical universe. This course expands on General Science I and II courses. Some of the areas covered in General Science III include the structure of matter, atomic nuclei and radioactivity, geology, oceanography, astronomy, microbiology, medicine, and science today and in the future.

Students at this level should show development in their ability and understanding of scientific inquiry. Some of the units contain experiments and projects that seek to develop meaning for the student and to engage the student actively. The continued exposure of science concepts and scientific inquiry will serve to improve the student’s skill and understanding.

Additional Resources
Some assignments in this course require the use of resources that must be supplied by the user.

High School Health (Grades 8 - 12)
High School Health is a health science elective course that introduces students to what good health is, why good health is important, and what students should do in order to achieve good health.
Music Appreciation (Grades 8 - 12)
The goal of this semester-long course is to provide instruction in basic musical elements, trace the development and growth of classical music, and give students a strong foundation for a greater appreciation of music. Students will examine music in the world around them and discover how they experience music. They’ll be introduced to the basic elements and sounds of music and instruments. Students will learn the names and backgrounds of several famous musical composers. Students will also learn how and where classical music began, how it developed over the centuries, and the ways in which music and culture affect each other. Lastly, students will examine the ways modern music has been influenced by classical music.

This course also provides students with lessons in engaged listening. These special lessons allow students to listen and respond to music. A template for how to listen and respond is provided.

Additional Resources
In addition to the default course program, Music Appreciation includes extra alternate lessons, projects, and tests for use in enhancing instruction or addressing individual needs. Below is a list of suggested resources which can be used in conjunction with these assignments.

All Projects, Reports, Essays in Course
Supplies needed to complete most projects, reports, and essays throughout this course:
Internet or other research material
Paper, pencils, or other writing material
Printer

1Project: Music Response
Access to at least 20 minutes of recorded or live classical music

1Project: Find Your Musical Heritage
Access to listening samples of traditional ethnic music

1Lesson: Engaged Listening
Access to at least 10 minutes of a listening sample of traditional ethnic music

2Project: Choose Your Instrument
Access to a listening sample of a favorite song

2Lesson: Engaged Listening
Internet access to a musical piece, “The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra” by Benjamin Britten

2Project: Creative Instrumentation
Access to two or three pictures of student’s choice of musical instrument
Access to two listening samples of student’s choice of musical instrument

3Lesson 5: Engaged Listening
Access to internet or other reference material

3Project: Renaissance Moods
Access to internet or other reference material

3Lesson 15: Engaged Listening
Access to internet or other reference material

3Project: Patron of the Arts
Access to internet or other reference material
Access to listening samples of music created by student’s choice of composer

4Lesson 5: Engaged Listening
Access to internet or other reference material

4Project: Composer Under Suspicion
Access to internet or another reference
Access to listening samples of music created by student’s choice of classical music composer

4Lesson 14: Engaged Listening
Access to internet or other reference material
Access to listening samples of music created by student’s choice of Romantic music composer

4Project: Art
Access to photographs of the following two paintings: “The Hay Wain” by John Constable and “The Battle of Trafalgar” by J.M.W. Turner

5Lesson 5: Engaged Listening
Access to internet or other reference material
Access to listening samples (at least 10 minutes long) of music created by student’s choice of 20th-century music composer

5Lesson 13: Engaged Listening
Access to internet or other reference material
Access to listening samples (at least 10 minutes long) of music created by student’s choice of 20th-century American music composer

5Project: Concert Experience
Option 1: Attend a local classical music concert.
Option 2: If no live concerts are available, an audio-visual recording of a classical music concert may be substituted.

Music Theory (Grades 9 - 12)
Music Theory is a semester-length fine arts elective for high school students. The course requires no prior instrumental, vocal, or music theory study. Using the piano keyboard as a visual basis for comprehension, the course materials explore the nature of music, integrating these concepts:
rhythm and meter
written music notation
the structure of various scale types
interval qualities
melody and harmony
the building of chords
transposition

Throughout the series of assignments, ear training exercises are interspersed with the bones of composition technique, building in students the ability not only to hear and appreciate music, but step-by-step, to create it in written form as well.

This highly interactive course culminates in the students producing original compositions, which while based on standard notation, demonstrate facets of personal expression. As the students’ ability to perform increases in the future, they will better understand music and therefore better demonstrate its intrinsic communication of emotion and ideas.

Additional Resources
In addition to the default course program, Music Theory includes extra alternate lessons, projects, and tests for use in enhancing instruction or addressing individual needs. Below is a list of suggested resources which can be used in conjunction with these assignments.

All Assignments
Printer

Native American Lore (Grades 7 - 12)
This is a half year course that can be used for either a half year of social studies or for an elective. The course is primarily project-based with some lessons to help enhance the student’s understanding of the subject matter.
Personal Financial Literacy (Grades 9 - 12)
Personal Financial Literacy is a semester-length elective designed to help high school students prepare for success in making financial decisions throughout their lives.
Topics in the course address the advantages of making sound financial decisions in both the short and long term, income planning, money management, saving and investing, and consumer rights and responsibilities.
Photography (Grades 7 – 12)
Photography teaches students how to care for their camera, the parts of a camera, how to take good shots, a little history of photography, and much more. A digital camera is necessary for the course.
Physical Education (Grades 9 - 12)
Physical Education is a semester-long elective designed for high school students. The course focuses on the performance of individual and team sports, with explanations of proper technique, rules of the game, and preparation. Team sports introduced include soccer, basketball, football, baseball, and volleyball. An introduction to fitness, strength, endurance, and nutrition is also included.

Students will have the opportunity to perform each sport on their own time while keeping a log of activity. The goal is incorporation of activity into their daily lives and the gain of lifelong healthy fitness habits.

Throughout the course, students may be asked to answer questions or to reflect on what they’ve read in their notes. The notes are not graded. Rather, they are a way for students to extend their thinking about the lesson content. Students may keep handwritten or typed notes.

Additional Resources
In addition to the default course program, Physical Education includes extra alternate lessons, projects, and tests for use in enhancing instruction or addressing individual needs. Below is a list of suggested resources which can be used in conjunction with these assignments.

All Projects, Reports, Essays in Course
Supplies needed to complete most projects, reports, and essays throughout this course:
Internet or other research material
Paper, pencils, or other writing material
Printer

1Muscular Strength and Endurance
Variety of hand-held weights, rubber tubing, or barbells, depending on exercises chosen

1Evaluating Your Fitness Level
Cloth tape measure, clock or watch with second hand, access to a 12-inch high step

1Project: Nutrition
3 nutritional labels off of food packaging

1Weight Management
Accurate scale, tape measure

1Soccer
Soccer ball or one of similar size
Large play area (at least 20 feet long)

1Basketball
Basketball or ball of similar size
Basketball court (helpful, but not mandatory)

1Volleyball
Volleyball or ball of similar size

1Project: Volleyball
Volleyball or ball of similar size
Gymnasium (helpful, but not mandatory)

1Baseball
Two movies about baseball

1Project: Baseball
TV for watching one inning of a televised baseball game

1Golf
Golf club (helpful, but not mandatory)

1Tennis
Tennis racquet, tennis balls

1Swimming
Swimsuit and access to a swimming pool (helpful, but not mandatory)

1Gymnastics
Clock or watch

1Running
Appropriate shoes for running Heart monitor (helpful, but not mandatory)

Physical Fitness (Grades 9 - 12)
Physical Fitness is a semester-length elective designed for high school students. The course focuses on the health benefits of regular physical activity and of a long-term exercise program.

As students work through the course, they will learn about the many aspects of physical fitness, including basic nutrition, the importance of flexibility, cardiovascular health, muscle and strength training, and realistic goal setting. Along the way, students will be required to maintain and submit an activity log in order to measure progress in course exercises, as well as in personal fitness goals.

Spanish I (Grades 9 - 12)
Spanish I is an entry-level high school foreign language course that explores the Spanish language through communication, culture, connections, comparisons, and communities.

Course materials are designed to support students as they work to gain a basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural competency.

Spanish II (Grades 10 - 12)
Spanish II is a high school foreign language course that builds upon skills and concepts taught in Spanish I, emphasizing communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities.

Course materials are designed to support students as they work to gain a basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural competency.

Spanish III (Grades 11 - 12)
Spanish III is a high school foreign language course that builds upon skills and concepts taught in Spanish II, emphasizing communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities.

Course materials are designed to support students as they work to gain a basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Spanish, and in cultural competency.

Trigonometry (Grades 9 - 12)
Trigonometry is a five-unit elective course for high school students who have successfully completed Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II. The materials cover a development of trigonometry from right triangle trigonometry to oblique triangles and the polar plane. Throughout the course, students will develop trigonometric formulas and use them in real-world applications, evaluate trigonometric proofs using complex trigonometric identities and solve trigonometric equations with regard to the unit circle.

Required Resources
Some assignments in this course require the use of resources that must be supplied by the user. These outside resources are listed by assignment.

All Assignments
Scratch Paper/Notebook
Scientific or Graphing Calculator

2,3 Various Assignments
Printer

Twentieth Century American History (Grades 9 - 12)
Twentieth Century American History is a history elective for high school students interested in examining American history during a century of change, continuity, and conflicts.

Students will examine America’s economic, political, governmental, cultural, and technological growing pains during the twentieth century. They will also consider the causes and effects of national and international cooperation, competition, and conflict.

Vietnam Era (Grades 9 - 12)
What comes to mind when you think about the Vietnam Era? For many, that period represents a difficult time in U.S. history. It is defined by an unpopular war that claimed the lives of 58,000 Americans and some 3 million Vietnamese. In this course, you’ll look at the history of the Vietnam War. The roots of the conflict stretch further back than you might know. You’ll examine why the United States got involved in the conflict and why the United States failed to achieve its objectives.

Additional Resources
In addition to the default course program, Vietnam Era includes alternate lessons, projects, essays, and tests for use in enhancing instruction or addressing individual needs.

All Projects, Reports, and Essays
Supplies needed to complete most projects, reports, and essays throughout this course:

Internet, encyclopedia or other research materials
Paper, pencils or other writing materials
Printer

3Project: Vietnam Era Songs
Examples of antiwar songs

Language Arts Electives

American Literature (Grades 7 - 12)
American Literature is a five-unit elective that engages high school students in a literary conversation with some of the most colorful and influential minds in American history. Their words will give students a greater understanding of themselves, their culture, and the ideas of others. The course teaches students the various movements in American literature, starting with the roots of American literature in writings from the Puritans. The course concludes with works by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and other black writers who were part of the struggle for racial freedom during the civil rights era.

Required Resources
Some assignments in this course require the use of resources that must be supplied by the user. These outside resources are listed below by assignment.

Our Town,Thornton Wilder

British Literature (Grades 7 - 12)
Beginning with works from the Middle Ages, British Literature is a five-unit course that teaches high school students about some of the greatest books of Western Civilization. Students will learn how to appreciate the English literature of the Middle Ages for its wisdom and beauty and will also gain a better understanding of the development of the English language and its literature. Course units cover one to two centuries, concluding with the writings of apologist C.S. Lewis in the 20th century.

Required Resources
Some assignments in this course require the use of resources that must be supplied by the user. These outside resources are listed below by assignment.

1Project – Metonymy
Newspapers and magazines

1Essay – Comparing Literature with Scripture
Bible

Literature 130 (Grades 7 - 11)
Literature course for grades 7 – 11 that uses primarily historical fiction books. Most of the books focus on early USA history. This is a one semester course.

Additional options:

College Dual Credit Program

Charity Christian Academy offers a Dual Credit program to help students prepare for work or further schooling. The goal is to have students earn a minimum of twenty-six college credits before they graduate from high school. Ambitious students may request to take more college-level courses than the sample programs list. 

Courses are offered by accredited colleges and include both academic and career/technical courses. While most students take basic general education courses such as English, history, math and social science, coursework may include areas such as business or criminal justice, depending on the various degree and certificate programs offered by each community college. 

All the courses are offered online to make it easy for students to access their classes from home. To accommodate the majority of students and families, we are partnering with several colleges with a variety of enrollment requirements and tuition fees. An overview of each college’s requirements and the programs that we offer in partnership with them, including any AP courses or CLEP tests that would help accumulate college credits is available through the drop-down list beside the college name.

Choose an option below for more information:

  • Hutchinson Community College – Dual Credit program
  • Colby Community College – Dual Credit program
  • College of Southern Nevada – Dual Credit Program

English III Kit (11th Grade)

  • Merriam-Websters Collegiate Dictionary
  • Our Town
  • To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Greek & Latin Roots Card
  • A Journal

Science Lab Kit – Integrated Physics and Chemistry

Contains 250 ml beaker, alcohol lamp with stand, bar magnet, bird seed, bubbles, foil baking tray, food coloring, graduated cylinder, mass scale, modeling clay, pipette, ruler, safety goggles, sand, sulfuric acid, thermometer, thread, and vials. You will still need to gather some common items from around your home to use in some experiments.

Science Lab Kit – Biology

Contains 250 ml beaker, alcohol lamp with stand, baby lima bean seeds, biology slide set, calcium oxide pellets, economical magnifier, economy dissection tool kit, electrolysis kit, foil baking pan, friction pad, glucose test strips, graduated cylinder, grass seed, household ammonia, hydrochloric acid, iodine solution, marble set, marigold seeds, methylene blue, peat moss, pen light, petri dishes, phenolphthalein solution, radish seeds, red & blue litmus paper, ring stand with base, safety goggles, sand, cover slips and slides, sodium sulfate, stirring rod, test tube rack, test tubes, thermometer, thermometer clamp, thistle tube, wire test tube holder, and wood splints. You will still need to gather some common items from around your home to use in some experiments.

Science Lab Kit – Chemistry

Item only ships to continental U.S. destinations.

Contains 10 ml graduated glass cylinder, 100 ml graduated glass cylinder, 250 ml glass beaker, 250 ml glass Erlenmeyer flask, 600 ml glass beaker, acetate sheets, alcohol burner, ascorbic acid, borax, Boyles Law apparatus with instructions, bulb with socket, calcium chloride, D-cell battery with holder, economy magnifier, electrode set, glycerol, hydrochloric acid, ferrous sulfate, ferric chloride, granular iron, lead shot, lithium chloride, magnesium ribbon, Milk of Magnesia, modeling clay, Nichrome wire with handle, nylon casting line, paradichlorobenzene, pH Papers (1-14 range, 100 pack), pipette, plastic funnel, potassium chloride, potassium chromate, potassium permanganate, ring stand with base, 3″ diameter ring support, safety goggles, silver nitrate, slinky, sodium hydroxide, spectroscope, stirring rod, strontium chloride, sulfur, sulfuric acid, test tube brush, test tube clamp, test tube rack, test tubes, thermometer, triangle, 12″-20mm glass tube, 3″-5mm glass tube, watch glass, wire gauze, and zinc. You will still need to gather some common items from around your home to use in some experiments.

Science Lab Kit – Physics

Contains acetate sheets, bar magnet, 100 ml glass graduated cylinder, acrylic cube prism, adding machine tape, alligator clip, steel ball, D-cell battery with holder, bulb with holder, carbon paper, 8 ½”x 11″ cardboard, 2″ C-clamp, Burette clamp, modeling clay, compass, converging lens, digital pocket scale, Dynamic cart set with spring, electrostatic kit, 6″-20mm glass tube, graph paper, grooved plastic ruler, microscope slides, iron metal filings, liquid graphite, oleic acid, pen light, pipette, threaded pith balls, polarizer analyzer, protractor, ring stand with base, rubber stoppers, rubbing alcohol, semicircular petri dish, slinky, spark timer, helical spring, stopwatch, student thermometer, talcum powder, tongue depressor, tracing paper, weight set with hook. You will still need to gather some common items from around your home to use in some experiments.

Purchase options

or

Tuition billed seperately ($50 a month for 12 months).


 

Add-ons

 

Enrollment process